Chagwa

There was a big feeling of pride when I received my personal copy of a new book where my name is mentioned in the credits. It’s not like I feel the book would not have been there without me, but I’m very grateful that my name can go as a permanent endorsement for the content.

I’m referring to Chagwa V1.0, the book from Jürgen Van Gorp about “Allowing Change, Agile and Waterfall Projects in the Organisation”. It explains how to combine different methodologies and shows that in the project-world, there is no one-size-fits-all.

In my own career, I have already seen many flavors of project management methodologies, from company-adapted PMI flavors to extremely strict Scrum follow-up (yes, it was as inefficient as it sounds). I even once had an intake interview with somebody asking me: “Can you also manage the project in an Agile way?” I replied: “Sure, as long as it is not your attempted excuse for not testing or documenting the product to deliver.” The project actually never happened for lack of budget.

In Project Management, like in all other management disciplines, the most important tool to use is common sense. A treat that is often overseen when religiously clinging to a strict methodology. Or as Katherina Swings put it in her blog: get out of the box and start thinking circular.

That’s why I like Chagwa so much. It puts the focus back where it belongs: on the “product” to deliver, and not on the methodology how to get there.

If you are interested in reading more, the book is available from Linchpin Books.

Happy reading!

William

2017-12-21T07:49:30+00:00 0 Comments

About the Author:

William is a Down-to-earth & getting-things-done All-Round Manager with a strong belief in structured approach and appropriate-level documentation. His main value is a big picture view for keeping work on the right track, but able to quickly switch to short follow-up crisis-mode if the situation requires it (in his spare time, he is race director for car races). He has a proven track-record in putting "lost" projects back on track. He prefers a technology-driven development environment. Specialties: making different-minded individuals work together towards the same goal; broad technical generalistic view.

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